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Russian Events NY

"The Dancers" photography exhibit by Nina Alovert

Nina Alovert, a native of Leningrad, received her master’s degree in history from Leningrad State University. She worked as a curator at the Comedy Theatre Museum, and photographer for the Komissarzhevskaya and Lensoviet Theatres. She began following the Kirov Ballet (now the Mariinsky) with her camera in the early 1950s. Alovert’s photographs were featured in books on ballet published by Iskusstvo Publishing, as well as numerous magazines and newspapers in the USSR.
Alovert immigrated to the United States in 1977. She is a freelance photographer and writer for Dance Magazine and Ballet Review. Her work has appeared in Russian newspapers published in the U.S. (Novoe Russkoe Slovo, Novy Amerikanets) and in periodicals and books in Russia and throughout the world. Alovert has had solo exhibitions of her work in New York, London, St. Petersburg and elsewhere.
She is the author of Baryshnikov in Russia (Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1984), Vladimir Malakhov (Moscow, 2003), Petersburg Mirrors (Moscow, 2003), Mikhail Baryshnikov (Moscow, 2004), Yulia Makhalina (Moscow 2009), Boris Eifman. Yesterday, Today… (SPB, 2012), and editor of the book on Nikolai Tsiskaridze «Полета вольное упорство» (Moscow, 2010).
“The Dancers” is a retrospective of photographs from both the Russian and American periods. The exhibit will be on view Monday – Friday, 10:00am to 5:00pm.

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The Roast of Israel @Standup NY

Message from ISRAMERICA & Artists4Israel: We lovingly roast Israel and mercilessly skewer its mindless critics. Too many people like to make uninformed attacks against Israel. We host the Roast to show just how silly they are and to point out some of the actually negative things about the country: the cab drivers, the tourists and the way hummus feels the next day. No holds barred – this is a Roast just like those you see on Comedy Central – prepare for the worst!
Happy Hour (1/2 off drinks): 8:30PM – 9:00PM
2 drink minimum during show.

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Marina Rubin's Stealing Cherries BOOK RELEASE CELEBRATION

Join Marina Rubin as she reads from her new book of flash fiction “Stealing Cherries.” Stories in 150 to 300 words, flash fiction is a new and exciting genre in these fast-paced times. Marina will delight you with endearing characters, tales of Russian-Jewish experience, full of humor, charm, wisdom and sensuality.
Q&A, book signing, wine and food reception with surprise musical guest immediately following the reading.
$20 includes a free copy of the book signed by the author.
Made possible through a grant by the BluePrint Fellowship project of COJECO, funded by the UJA-Federation of New York and Genesis Philanthropy Group.
Additional sponsor HEERING CHERRY LIQUEUR – a fashion accessory since 1818.
Space is limited.
PLEASE REGISTER HERE, I CAN’T STRESS IT ENOUGH.
BOOK INFORMATION:
“Riveting as a novel, concise as a poem, Stealing Cherries is a narrative picnic spread out like a painting by Manet.”
—Jill Hoffman, author of Mink Coat and Jilted
“Precisely chiseled blocks of soulful, funny, heart-rending fiction.”
—Ted Jonathan, author of Bones & Jokes
“Rubin will take you on a gritty but glamorous tour through New Delhi, Italy, Wall Street, the French Riviera, Grand Canyon, and Brooklyn. . . . And still, you will be the one who’s running to catch up with her wit, wisdom, and wondrously poetic narratives.”
—Michael Montlack, author of Cool Limbo
Whether she’s writing an engaging account of childhood memories from the Ukraine (“Otlichnitsa”), her family’s quixotic immigration experiences (“Welcome to America”), or current romantic misadventures (“Curious Things at the W Hotel”), with a unique voice and sharp eye for detail, award-winning author Marina Rubin reveals the triumphant absurdities of contemporary times. Her stories and characters are all too human, too familiar, too flawed, and just charming enough to be endearing and unforgettable in these poetic, bite-sized short stories.
Marina Rubin’s writing has appeared in more than seventy literary journals and magazines. Her family emigrated from the former Soviet Union seeking political asylum in 1989. She is an associate editor of Tribeca’s literary and art magazine Mudfish, and a 2013 recipient of COJECO’s Blueprint Fellowship. She resides in Brooklyn, New York.
Available in bookstores, Amazon/Barnes & Noble on October 15, 2013

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Russian Events NY

Russian Documentary Film Festival in New York

The sixth annual Russian Documentary Film Festival in New York
From Friday, October 4 through Sunday, October 6, 2013
At Tribeca Cinemas (54 Varick Street, Manhattan), DCTV (Downtown Community Centre – 87 Lafayette St., Manhattan), Brooklyn Public Library (10 Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn) and Russian Centre «Otrada» (Village of Chestnut Ridge, NY). All films screened at Tribeca Cinemas and DCTV will be shown with English subtitles.
The sixth annual Russian Documentary Film Festival in New York is proud to present a varied program of new documentaries – all winners of Russian and international film festivals in the 2012/2013 season. They are films by directors from Russia and Russian Diaspora in America.

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Chagall: Love, War, and Exile

Chagall: Love, War, and Exile, for the first time in the U.S., explores a significant but neglected period in the artist’s career from the rise of fascism in the 1930s through 1948, years spent in Paris and then in exile to New York. Marc Chagall (1887–1985), one of the foremost modernists of the 20th century, created his unique style by drawing on elements from richly colored folk art motifs, the Russian Christian icon tradition, Cubism, and Surrealism.
Beginning with the evocative paintings from his years in France, the exhibition illuminates an artist deeply responsive to the suffering inflicted by war—often expressed with Christian imagery—and to his own personal losses and intimate sorrows. The exhibition includes 31 paintings and 22 works on paper, as well as selected letters, poems, photos, and ephemera.
Escaping the hardships of Soviet life following the Revolution, Chagall moved to Paris with his wife, Bella, and daughter, Ida. During this productive period, Chagall assimilated the French artistic tradition, creating a series of portrait-like flower paintings, vibrant in color and texture.
Chagall’s exile from Russia also inspired work based on memories of his childhood and of the Bolshevik Revolution. Chagall depicted a cathedral that dominated the town of Vitebsk, and drew on a remembered storehouse of symbols meaningful to both Jews and Christians, presaging the Christian imagery—in particular the Crucifixion—in work to come.
Like many Eastern European Jews who had fled to France, Chagall’s world was threatened by Nazism. In 1941, with an invitation from Alfred Barr of the Museum of Modern Art, he and Bella escaped to New York City. With the onset of the war and this second exile in New York, themes of violence and disruption characterize Chagall’s work.
The most prevalent image Chagall used during World War II was of Jesus and the Crucifixion. For Chagall, the Crucifixion was a symbol for all the victims of persecution, a metaphor for the horrors of war, and an appeal to conscience that equated the martyrdom of Jesus with the suffering of the Jewish people and the Holocaust. While other Jewish artists depicted the crucified Jesus, for Chagall it became a frequent theme.
Unlike his years in Paris, Chagall was never completely comfortable during his wartime exile in New York. The artist felt disconnected from the places he understood best – Russia and Paris. This feeling of alienation was compounded by a devastating personal tragedy—the sudden death of his wife, Bella, in September 1944.
Chagall soon established a new relationship with Virginia Haggard McNeil, moving with her to High Falls in upstate New York. His work from this time often expresses a tension—between the memory of Bella and the new presence of Virginia—resulting in fraught but revealing compositions. Gradually, as the artist emerged from his sadness, and the horrors of war receded, the work from this period begins to reflect the more familiar Chagall, expressed in joy-filled paintings replete with intense color and levitating figures.
Chagall: Love, War, and Exile is organized by Susan Tumarkin Goodman, Senior Curator Emerita at The Jewish Museum. A fully illustrated, 148-page catalogue featuring 72 color reproductions, 27 black and white illustrations, and eleven of Chagall’s rarely seen poems will be co-published with Yale University Press. – See more at: http://www.thejewishmuseum.org/exhibitions/chagall-love-war-exile#sthash.x9baVCaW.dpuf

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Russian Events NY

12th Annual Russian Film Week in NYC

Every year, for more than a decade, New Yorkers have been introduced to the best of modern Russian cinema and the talent behind it.
Since its launch in 2000, the film week has introduced New York to the latest works of Russian filmmakers, actors, and producers. Russian Film Week NYC has become the landmark cultural entertainment event of the city, and is highly regarded by the Russian-speaking community as well as enthusiasts of foreign and indie cinema. After a yearlong hiatus, the beloved festival returns to New York with the support of Kartina.TV, the leading IPTV provider of Russian-language programming. This year’s program will also feature Q&A sessions, panel discussions, and master classes led by the participating filmmakers and actors, as well as Hollywood directors, producers, and film critics.
All films will be shown with English subtitles.
Venues:
Ziegfeld Theater, 141 W 54th St., New York, NY 10019
Silas Theater, School of Visual Arts Theater, 333 W 23rd St New York, NY 10011
Beatrice Theater, School of Visual Arts Theater, 333 W 23rd St New York, NY 10011
Millennium Theater, 1029 Brighton Beach Ave Brooklyn, NY 11235

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Russian Events NY

Valera and Natasha Cherkashin: Khrushchev and Mao: an Exhibit

This exhibit features pieces by the artists Valera and Natasha Cherkashin.
Nikita Khrushchev (1894–1971) had perhaps one of the most colorful personalities of all Soviet leaders. Lacking a formal education, he rose from a village shepherd to the leader of a world superpower, emerging by the mid-1950s as the country’s undisputed leader and Stalin’s successor.
This exhibit explores Khrushchev’s visit to China in 1959. At the time of this historic visit, color photography did not yet exist in the USSR. As a popular substitute, many black and white photographs were enlarged and hand-painted to resemble color photographs. Some photographers, including Boris Mikhailov, used this technique in their art.
The exhibit features pieces by the artists Valera and Natasha Cherkashin. These pieces, using images from the Cherkashins’ own collection, are treated digitally in imitation of this popular technique. The works include newspaper clips from this period, and the exhibit will also feature popular Khrushchev and Mao jokes from this time.

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Russian Events NY

Mad Meg Live

Mad Mag’s songs are energetic ballads that possess a fair amount of debauchery, tragicomedy, and nostalgia. Dark and awkward lyrics paint the disturbing picture of a daily life of a lone urban dweller set to the background of upbeat minor key melodies.
Come early, stay late! Also on the bill are THE SMOKING FLOWERS, THE LAST CAR, JED PARISH
Here is a video invite to this show:

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10th Annual Shashlik in the Sukkah

Celebrate the harvest festival of Sukkot in style with food, drink, and conversation in the JCC’s beautiful rooftop sukkah. Engage with other Russian-speakers over holiday rituals and the shared connection of eating in a temporary shelter, much as our ancestors did.
Generation R programs are generously supported by the Genesis Philanthropy Group.

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Brooklyn Sukkot Festival and Block Party

Food Trucks, Performances by Debbie Brukman and Golem, Bouncy House, Photo Booth, Arts and Crafts and Social Action Projects Visit our Community Sukkah
Rain location – 274 Garfield Place RSVP’s appreciated www.cbebk.org/sukkot