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Art Calls

Art on Brighton Festival calls for artists

Art on Brighton is a community-based multidisciplinary festival, taking place on September 8, 2012 on the Brighton Beach boardwalk and beach, and at the New York Aquarium. Artists who are at all stages in their careers and work in such media as performance, social practice, installation, dance, sculpture, photography, film, sound, video, writing, poetry, and architecture, are welcome to apply. Preference will be given to works responding to the local issues, stimulating public dialogue, and engaging with the neighborhood, as well as such topics as immigration, environmentalism, politics, language, gender, and religion. To apply, please email your proposal and website or portfolio, along with a brief description of the piece. Deadline June 30.

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Art Calls

Blueprint Fellowship

Starting in November 2012, the COJECO BluePrint Fellowship will support the fourth cohort of Russian-speaking Jewish individuals ages 25-40, who will receive a grant from $1,000 to $5,000 to develop projects that engage with our community on a meaningful and significant level.
Projects should be innovative initiatives that impact the Russian Jewish community in areas such as arts and culture, technology, environmentalism, social justice, fundraising, volunteering, gender and sexuality, children and families, etc. All projects must have a demonstrated Jewish focus or theme.
After a highly selective one-on-one and group interview process, you will be accepted into the year long fellowship, where you will interact with peers, learn new skills, be matched with a personal project mentor, and gain connections.
You will take part in a 3-day weekend retreat, participate in exciting workshops, interact with alumni, examine identity, meet other talented thinkers and social activists, and much more.
Ultimately you will have the resources, financial support, peer input and, most of all, autonomy to bring your idea to life!
Applications to the 2012-2013 BluePrint Fellowship will be due by September 30th, 2012.

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Art Calls

INDUSTRIAL 59

Commemorating 105 anniversary of the first movie ever made (46 seconds long) “La Sortie de l’Usine Lumière à Lyon” (“Workers leaving Lumiere factory in Lyon”) by Brother’s Lumiere, Project 59 Seconds Video Festival in cooperation with First Ural Industrial Biennale of Contemporary Art in Ekaterinburg is announcing initiated by Biennale commissar Alisa Prudnikova a special call for video works:
59 seconds about industrial or postindustrial environments, industrial objects or processes, life and labor of workers, industrial landscapes and worker’s unions, industrial music, industrial piercing or any other aspect that relate to industrial theme.
Industrial revolution influenced avant-guard art of the beginning of 20th century. What are relations between them 100 years later?
Submission is free and open to all. When sending submissions by mail, send an e-mail notification with your personal and contact information: name, address, phone, e-mail, etc. along with 59 words about yourself and 59 words about submitted video work to project59@gmail.com
Send submissions to:
Project 59
303 Beverley Rd.  Apt. 5K
Brooklyn, NY 11218

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Art Calls

Share your story at "HIAS: My Story"

Message from Genia Brin, mother of Sergei Brin, National Chair of myStory, HIAS board member:
“If you are an immigrant from the former Soviet Union, like my family, I imagine you also were introduced to HIAS within hours of leaving the Soviet Union. HIAS met us at the Vienna airport and at the train in Rome and gave us local currency to use immediately. HIAS case workers helped us to fill out our emigration forms, arranged interviews at the US Consulate, and bought us tickets to travel to the United States. To this day, HIAS continues to help Russian Jews in America receive life-saving public benefits and educational scholarships, register to vote, organize self-help groups, and so much more.
Now the new HIAS website, myStory.hias.org, gives each Russian émigré another opportunity of a lifetime – to tell the story of his or her struggle and accomplishments, to pass on precious memories, to remember dear ones, and to express our hopes for the future. For while the official history of the movement is well-known, what is yet to be told are the personal experiences of ordinary Soviet Jews and non-Jews – people like you and me – who applied for exit visas despite severe pressure from the authorities and the risk of losing their livelihood, and who left everything behind in order to start a new, freer life.”